Spotify engineering culture (part 1)

Here’s part 1 of short animated video describing our engineering culture (here’s part 2).

This is a journey in progress, not a journey completed, and there’s a lot of variation from squad to squad. So the stuff in the video isn’t all true for all squads all the time, but it appears to be mostly true for most squads most of the time :o)

Here’s the whole drawing:

.Spotify-Engineering-Culture-Part1

(Tools used: Art Rage, Wacom Intuos 5 drawing tablet, and ScreenFlow)

Here’s Part 2.

 

Comments

  1. […] By “product team” I mean a cross-functional, self-organized team which consists of a product manager, product designer, and 4-10 engineers. Marty Cagan also uses this definition in his book INSPIRED – How to create tech products customers love. In my opinion, one of the best books to read for a product manager. If you don’t have it yet, get a copy! Also, Spotify uses a similar concept of product squads. If you haven’t heard yet about the Spotify engineering culture, you should really check it out here. […]

  2. […] Spotify, for example, groups its more than 2,000 employees into agile teams, called squads, that are self-organizing, cross-functional, and colocated. There is no single appointed leader of a squad. The mantra is that “alignment enables autonomy — the greater the alignment, the more autonomy you can grant.” A leader’s job is to figure out the right problem and communicate it, so squads can collaborate to find the best solution. […]

  3. […] Spotify, for example, groups its more than 2,000 employees into agile teams, called squads, that are self-organizing, cross-functional, and colocated. There is no single appointed leader of a squad. The mantra is that “alignment enables autonomy — the greater the alignment, the more autonomy you can grant.” A leader’s job is to figure out the right problem and communicate it, so squads can collaborate to find the best solution. […]